Role of B. Licheniformis in bio mineralization of calcium carbonate and its biological applications

  • Balakrishnan Arumugam Assistant professor, Centre for Biological Sciences, K.S.Rangasamy College of Arts and Science (Autonomous), Tiruchengode - 637215, Namakkal (Dt), Tamil Nadu, India
  • Brinda Elangovan Assistant professor, Centre for Biological Sciences, K.S.Rangasamy College of Arts and Science (Autonomous), Tiruchengode - 637215, Namakkal (Dt), Tamil Nadu, India
Keywords: Biomineralization, B. licheniformis, calcium carbonate

Abstract

Bio mineralization is a significant process carried out by living organisms in which minerals are produced through the hardening of biological tissues. Herein, the current study focus on calcium carbonate precipitation, as part of bio mineralization, to be used in applications for CO2 sequestration, material technology, and other fields. A strain B. licheniformis, isolated from marine water, was investigated for its ability to produce urease and induce calcium carbonate precipitation in a metabolic process. It was discovered that B. licheniformis, resisted high concentrations of urea up to 60 g/L. In order to optimize the calcification process of B. licheniformis, the Calcium carbonate precipitation media is used respectively, pH of 10, and culture time of 96 h. Using X-ray diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy analysis, the calcium carbonate polymorphs produced by B. licheniformis, were proven to be mainly calcite. The results of this research provide evidence that B. licheniformis can biologically induce calcification and suggest that B. licheniformis may play a potential role in the synthesis of new bio minerals and in bioremediation or bio recovery.

References

1. Ai-Thawadi. Ureolytic bacteria and calcium carbonate formation as a mechanism of strength enhancement of sand. J Adv Sci Eng Res, 2011, 1:98-114.
2. Banks ED, Taylor NM, Gulley J, Lubbers BR, Giarrizo JG, Bullen HA, Hoehler TM, Barton HA. Bacterial Calcium Carbonate Precipitation in Cave Environments: A Function of Calcium Homeostasis. Geomicrobiol J, 2010, 27:444-454.
3. Bosak T, Newman DK. Microbial kinetic controls on calcite morphology in supersaturated solutions. J Sediment Res , 2005, 75:190-199.
4. Braissant O, Decho AW, Dupraz C. Exopolymeric substance of sulfate-reducing bacteria: interactions with calcium at alkaline pH and implication for formation of carbonate minerals. Geobiology , 2007, 5:401-411.
5. Chahal N, Rajor A, Siddique R. Calcium carbonate precipitation by different bacterial strains. Afr J Biotechnol, 2011, 10:8359-8372.
6. De Muynck W, De Belie N, Verstraete W. Microbial carbonate precipitation in construction materials: A review. Ecol Eng, 2010, 36:118-136.
7. Decho AW. Overview of biopolymer-induced mineralization: What goes on in biofilms? Ecol Eng, 2009, xxx:1484-1491.
8. Gonzalez-Muñoz MT, Rodriguez-Navarro C, Martinez-Ruiz F. Bacterial biomineralization: new insights from myxococcus-induced mineral precipitation. Geological Society, London Special Publications, 2010, 336:31-50.
9. Jansson C, Northen T. Calcifying cyanobacteria-the potential of biomineralization for carbon capture and storage. Curr Opin Biotechnol, 2010, 21:1-7.
10. Jroundi F, Fern¢ndez-Vivas A, Rodriguez-Navarro C. Bioconservation of deteriorated monumental calcarenite stone and identification of bacteria with carbonatogenic activity. Environ Microbiol, 2010, 60:39-54.
11. Keykha HA, Huat BBK, Asadi A, Kawasaki S. Electro-Biogrouting and Its Challenges. Int J Electrochem Sci, 2012, 7:1196-1204.
12. Li W, Liu LP, Zhou PP. Calcite precipitation induced by bacteria and bacterially produced carbonic anhydrase. Curr Sci, 2011, 100:502-508.
13. Muynck WD, Belie ND, Verstraete W. Microbial carbonate precipitation in construction materials: A review. Ecol Eng, 2010, 36:118-136.
14. Okwahha GDO, Li J. Optimum conditions for microbial carbonate precipitation. Chemosphere, 2010, 81:1143-1148.
15. Pedone VA, Folk RL. Formation of aragonite cement by nannobacteria in the Great Salt Lake, Utah. Geology, 2010, 24:763-765.
16. Rodriguez-Navarro C, Jroundi F, SchiroMet. Influence of substrate mineralogy on bacterial mineralization of calcium carbonate: implication for stone conservation. Appl Environ Microbiol, 2012, 78:4017-4029.
17. Ruyt MV, Zon WV. Biological in situ reinforcement of sand in near-shore areas. Geotechnical Eng, 2009, 162:81-83.
18. S¢nchez-Rom¢n M, Romanek CS, Fern¢adez-Remolar DC. Aerobic biomineralization of Mg-rich carbonates: Implications for natural environments. Chem Geol, 2011, 281:143-150.
19. Shirakawa MA, Cincotto MA, Atencio D. Effect of culture medium on biocalcification by Pseudomonas putida, Lysibacillus sphaericus and Bacillus subtilis. Braz J Microbiol, 2011, 42:499-507.
20. Van Paassen LA, Daza CM, Staal M, Sorokin DY, van der Zon W, van Loosdrecht MCM. Potential soil reinforcement by biological denitrification. Ecol Eng, 2010, 36:168-175.
Published
2019-11-02
How to Cite
Arumugam, B., & Elangovan, B. (2019). Role of B. Licheniformis in bio mineralization of calcium carbonate and its biological applications. International Research Journal of Multidisciplinary Technovation, 1(6), 622-629. Retrieved from https://mapletreejournals.com/index.php/irjmt/article/view/342